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Reconciliation

By Carldell J. Coleman & Remy Benoit


We all have a reason for being here; each of us with a mission that no one else can fulfill for us. Sometimes we find it hard to even know what that mission is. To gain the clarity of vision to listen for guidance, we must find the quiet of prayer and meditation. Setting aside that time, with our ever increasingly busy schedules, is often quite difficult, but it is as necessary to our well being and purpose as are sleep and food.

              It is in that quiet, in that communion, connection, that we find reconciliation with all parts of our lives. It is in the quiet that we begin to orchestrate harmony in our own lives, and in those of all with whom we come in contact.
    

       The gentleman who has graced us with his thoughts here below is a very special man. He is the one who delivers my mail everyday, and so much more. Mr. Coleman is a man who walks each step of his postal route and his life trying to be in accordance with his Creator. He actively works with Christian Reconciliation with his Church group. He graces our street and all the others he touches with his caring.

       As autumn wends its way to us, we think of the time of gathering in. It is a time of High Holy Days, it is a time of harvest and Thanksgiving. What better time for us to contemplate the role we play in finding our own paths, and what role we play, as Mr. Coleman points out, as leaders, models, mentors for others.
       A gathering in time is a time for balancing ledgers...what has gone out, what has come in.
       In the Judaic tradition it is the time of the New Year; it is also the time of Yom Kippur. It is a time for taking account of what you have done, what you have not done. What lies heavy on your path? What glorifies it? What reconciliation needs to be addressed?

            Before Mr. Coleman’s thought is shared with you, perhaps we should consider these questions:

            Have I compromised who I really am for something of short time desire, necessity, recognition?

            Have I honored all promises made to others?

            Has my behavior been of the sort that would make me a role model, a leader?

            How often have I let fear strike out - instead of giving out love?

            Have I considered that while I might find others a problem, that someone else might find me one?

             Have I been counting up only what I perceive as lack in my life, or have I been saying thank you for all the wonderful gifts that come to me each day? Have I stopped to see the radiant beauty of a hibiscus; listened to the sound of the shore birds; breathed deep the clean, crisp air of a mountain top?

             Have I told someone whom I love deeply that I do?

             Have I thanked someone who has been more than patient with me for that patience?

             Will my actions of this year, where ever it begins and ends for me, be of the nature to be well recorded?

              

            
            Harvest time is a time for gathering in: a time for Reconciliation.

And now from Mr. Coleman:

      
      Everybody is a leader to somebody....
      We will probably never be called upon to lead an army. Yet in our own way we are all Spartacus, all leaders with power to inspire-
or disappoint-others within the circle of our influence.
      You don't have to strive to be a leader; the very fact you believe in Christ makes you one.
      The real question is where are we leading our followers.





Some suggestions on links to different paths to Reconciliation:


              SilentListeningintheNewDawn.

ABriefIllustratedGuideToUnderstandingIslam.

Forgiveness:BreakingtheChainofHate.

         HealingAmericanWounds.

    
        TikkunOlam.

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This item is part of WelcomeHomeSoldier.com: historian, author, editor, and educator Remy Benoit's ongoing weblog for Veterans, writers, students, and others who believe in learning from and making history; including thousands of articles and posts and the free writing seminar, Using History for Healing and Writing.


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